What’s Your Multiplier?

In this post I’m going to talk about the concept of multipliers: a handy tool to help show where a beginner or intermediate Daygamer’s weak points lay. I’ll be going through my stats from 2018 (the last time I kept full stats for a year) and from my recent Prague trip (the last time I kept full stats, period) as working examples.

The multiplier is simply how many of one stage you need to get to the next stage. There are three main ones: approach to number, number to date and date to lay. The aim is to get each one to be roughly the same before progressing to the next level/multiplier.

I think it’s best to try and keep the multipliers similar to each other because of diminishing returns. Let’s say that your approach to number ratio is 5:1 and your number to date ratio is also 5:1, but your date to lay ratio is 10:1. That shows that your date Game is lacking and there are likely to be more low hanging fruit which you can address. It will almost certainly be easier to fix the issues with your dating than getting better ratios elsewhere.

Here’s the first working example, my stats from 2018:

2018

Approaches

Numbers

Dates

Lays

815

221

37

14

Multiplier

3.7

6.0

2.6

What should stand out from this was the multiplier of six under dates; that meant it took me six phone numbers to get a date. If I saw these stats today I’d encourage the Daygamer to analyse their text Game and see where they were going wrong: maybe they were going for the date request too quickly and needed to simply leave it for another few messages or even another day. Or maybe they were making their date requests too forward for some girls: going for a drink rather than a coffee. On the flipside, maybe they were doing too much banter before getting to their date requests and ended up losing momentum with the girl in question. A quick review of their text exchanges would reveal this.

The other way they might solve this issue is to take less flaky numbers; perhaps stop pushing through boyfriend objections or other, low interest/availability signals. The knock-on effect would be taking fewer phone numbers and affecting that multiplier but it’s important to not see this in isolation: the Daygamer can be improving their street Game at the same time which would counter that effect.

Here’s the second working example, my stats from my recent trip to Prague:

Prague 2020

Approaches

Numbers

Dates

Lays

84

29

8

1

Multiplier

2.9

3.6

8.0

This time the multiplier of eight underneath lays sticks outs. Out of eight girls to come out on dates only one lay. What a chode!

Here we can look at the circumstances: I was pushed for time and so needed to get out on as many dates as possible and the figure includes going for idates in my final week to try and push for SDLs. I also suffered from the fact that my stay there was temporary and many girls don’t want to get involved in anything short term.

But what would I say to a guy who had these stats in his hometown? Obviously he would need to work on his dating and try to see whether, in general, he was over or under pulling, and then come up with some rules of thumb to address that. For example, the underpuller might need to promise himself always to go for the kiss on the first date; the overpuller might need to promise himself to only go for the bounceback if he gets a heavy makeout on the first date.

The aim with this analysis is to bring the Daygamer to a point where each multiplier is roughly the same. This gives the below approach to lay ratios together with a rough estimation of their level:

Multiplier

Approach:Lay

Rough Level

1

1

2

8

3

27

Advanced

4

64

Intermediate

5

125

Beginner

6

216

*

7

343

8

512

9

729

10

1000

* For someone with an average multiplier of six or higher I think they may have a quality issue and are aiming too high. Remember to walk before you run. It can also be an issue for someone in their first 1000 sets to have some glaring holes in their Game which, thankfully, this method highlights.

Yours unfaithfully,

Thomas Crown

2 thoughts on “What’s Your Multiplier?

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